Architecture

Architecture

May 27 2016

These images of the G House in Brussels, Belgium, have charmed us for some time. The impressive three-storey townhouse was designed in 1907 by the architects François Kielbaey and J. L'Anvre.

The building’s French limestone façade was restored by the Brussels-based architect Olivier Dwek as part of an extensive re-configuration.



The exceptionally lovely single-family residence has retained its majestic, classical elements: mouldings, fireplaces, wide archways and windows with curved contours.



We wrote about Dwek’s work last year - the T House on the Greek Island of Zakynthos – and noted the clarity and confidence with which the residence speaks the languages of both the past and the present; of local traditions and modern minimalism.



The same can be said of the Brussels residence. Although the building is traditional and exudes old-world charm, the renovation has also added an edge of current cool. Yet, the result is a timeless elegance that carries no specific label.



Original windows were restored where possible and some were replaced with exact replicas of the original. Light flows beautifully throughout the building, letting the garden in to add its green colour to the otherwise white interior.



One of our favourite elements is the central staircase that was extended up n additional floor. The imposing black wrought-iron balustrade of the new section is an identical reproduction of the original one below.



Olivier Dwek has designed some of the furniture for this residence, but the most distinctive pieces in these images come from two of his favourites Pierre Jeanneret and Charlotte Perriand. The soft forms of the mouldings, doorways and windows contrast beautifully with the more angular, contemporary-yet-classic, visually imposing forms of their furniture.



Jeanneret was a Swiss architect who for more than 20 years worked with his more famous cousin Charles Edouard Jeanneret – better known by his pseudonym, Le Corbusier.

In the Brussels residence, Jeanneret’s High Court Down sofa from about 1955 with its solid teak frame and white foalskin upholstery is positioned right next to French architect and designer Charlotte Perriand’s daybed (from 1956-59) with its elegant neck roll in white leather.



Under the staircase, Perriand’s Ombre chair of black bent plywood (1958) creates an stark connection with the black iron baluster.



Another startling setting is created by Perriand’s six-leaf table (1949) of solid pine surrounded by tiny rustic stools also by Perriand. - Tuija Seipell.

Photographer: Serge Anton





Architecture

April 17 2016

Slender supporting pilotis and horizontal slivers of concrete characterize the cube-like residential project, White House by Marcio Kogan’s StudiMK27.

The 500 square-meter (5380 sq.ft) building is an elegant example of tropical minimalism. It is constructed of durable industrial materials – concrete and white aluminum – to withstand the harsh tropical elements by the sea, yet it is deceivingly airy and weightless.



These external hallmarks link the Brazilian architect’s work with that of Lina Bo Bardi whose famous Casa de Vidro (Glass House) was completed in 1951, a year before Kogan was born.

Kogan admires Oscar Niemeyer but he has called Bo Bardi “the very best of Brazilian modernists” and he has consistently employed the very best of Bo Bardi’s favourite architectural elements.



White House is a private residence in São Paulo in the São Sebastião region known for its 36 beaches on the southeast coast of Brazil.

The house itself is basically a flat box on stilts, with the ground floor dedicated to all social activity including cooking and dining. The first floor houses all of the bedrooms and on top of that is the terrace garden accessible via a round hatch door.



The surrounding nature is present everywhere thanks to the liberal use of glass. Several other features inside contribute to the sensation of weightlessness.



The industrial materials are softened by the use of native wood. We love the perforated partitions that evoke the muxarabi, Moorish-inspired latticework screens and one of the hallmarks of Brazilian modernism.

In this residence, the partitions allow the light to filter through while creating lovely reflection patterns on the floors and walls.



We also love the floating cantilevered staircases that support the idea of lightness with their understated presence.



Studio MK27 created the White House with co-architect Eduardo Chalabi. The interior design is by Studio MK27 architect Diana Radomysler.



Marcio Kogan founded his Studio StudiMK27.in the early 1980s. He has since made a significant mark in the world of architecture, not just as a modernist in Brazil but globally as well. - Tuija Seipell.



Photographer: Fernando Guerra.

 

 

 

Architecture

April 1 2016

The ‘Swiss chalet’ style brings to mind wooden buildings with high gabled roofs, decorative carvings, rows of balconies and exposed wood beams.

But it is also a style that has been more or less ruined by its hundreds of boring, cookie-cut re-iterations in ski resorts around the world.

Even in the Alps, the chalet has become shorthand for pretty much anything that resembles a chalet and can house lots of tourists.

The traditional chalet, however, was a ‘chahtelèt’ (a shepherd’s hut), a solid wooden house with a gabled roof and shuttered windows, built on a stone foundation.

With this in mind, when Amsterdam-based SeARCH (Stedenbouw en ARCHitectuur =Urban Planning & Architecture) was approached by a client who had bought a property in the Swiss ski resort of Anzère, the architects proposed to start from scratch.

The steep hillside building plot was not large, so the architect proposed an entirely new chalet that is both compact and spacious.

Inspired by one of the oldest chalets in Switzerland, the Grand Chalet Balthus in Rossinière, they fitted the entire villa under one solid, clear wrapper.

The wide white edges of the frame give a distinctive and modern look to the three-level building with the guest house downstairs, the main living areas in the middle and a private apartment on the top level.

The garage, accessible from the lower road, is connected to all levels through an elevator that was carved into the mountain.

All floors open to a three-meter wide terrace with views over the Dent Blanche Massif with 4,000-metre peaks of Matterhorn, Dent Blanche, Dufourspitze and Weisshorn. - Tuija Seipell.

 

 

Architecture

December 12 2015

Architecturally alarming things could be expected when a movie mogul of big-budget action movies based on over-the-top special effects assigns his mega-million Los Angeles villa project to a globally recognized architect whose work includes a fantastical master plan for a place called Ice Cream City in Overtown, Florida.


 
Luckily, movie man Michael Bay (Transformers, Armageddon, Pearl Harbor) and architect Chad Oppenheim have many other things in common besides far-reaching imaginations.


 
Bay’s much-praised and publicized 30,00 square-foot (2,787 square-meter) crash and party pad (his actual home is in Miami, Florida) is elegant, minimalist and modern, reflecting as much Bay’s reverence and appreciation of good architecture as it does Oppenheim’s incredible ability to conjure elegant, iconic buildings.


 
Bay sold his previous L.A. house in 2009, and paid $10.9 million for a mid-century house on a five-acre lot on Bel Air Road. He caused a disapproving uproar by tearing the house down as it was considered somewhat important, even by L.A. standards. It was designed in 1951 by Burton Schutt with interiors by Billy Haines, and was for decades home to socialite Marion Jorgensen and steel magnate Earle Jorgensen (close friends with the Ronald Reagans).


 
To replace this house, he selected Chad Oppenheim’s concept residence whose renderings had been up on Oppenheim’s website for a long time, just waiting for the right client.


 
The three-story house has a 50-seat movie theater designed by Jeff Cooper, a movie prop museum, parking for several cars, a spa and several bedrooms, plus two master bedroom modules that hover above the rest of the building with incredible views of Los Angeles and Santa Monica.

An infinity pool along the cliff edge emphasizes the exquisite plan that allows the structure to sit in the hillside site as if it had always been there.


 
The project team was led by Chad Oppenheim with Oppenheim’s V.P. of Operations, Carl Romer, as the project manager. Also involved were L.A. architecture firms Rios Clementi Hale Studios and Stenfors Associate Architects, as well as interior designer Lorraine Letendre and decorator Lynda Murray. - Tuija Seipell.


Architecture

September 30 2015



Spectacular scenery – and sheep – are the first things that come to mind for most of us when we think of New Zealand.



For an architect, spectacular scenery is always both a challenge and an opportunity.



This was very much the situation for David Ponting, founder of Ponting Fitzgerald (in 1998) of Ponsonby, Auckland, New Zealand, when he saw the site for what his affluent client hoped would be a “sanctuary.”



The site was breathtaking with unbelievable views of Lake Wakatipu in Queenstown, New Zealand, and the mountains beyond.



Rocky, powerful terrain. Strong visual lines. Subdued color scheme. Nothing dainty or traditionally cozy was going to work. This site had a strong, powerful presence of its own.



Ponting and his client settled on a simple, yet very demanding, brief: Let the land speak. With a sensitivity that Ponting later described as having an “element of divination,” he allowed the site to express itself.



Rather than coming to the site with a preconceived set of shoulds and musts and limiting ideas, the architects kept walking the site. They eventually ‘divined’ a beautiful solution that speaks the same language as the site.

They realised that there were two separate locations on the site, each with its own distinct natural forms, each ‘asking for a building.’



They granted the wishes and created two low-profile structures, one as the master dwelling, the other – the larger one - as the guest wing.

When viewed from above, from the entrance way and parking area, each looks like a low-lying bird wing. Not imposing or interrupting, but somehow belonging in the landscape.



The breathtaking beauty of the structures comes from the strong elements: glass and stone, and polished, board-formed and in-situ poured concrete, with reflecting ponds and skylights adding an element of wonder – all in the service of letting the land speak, none standing in between the viewer and the view. The scenery is literally part of the interior, especially in the guest wing that is more open and grandiose than the slightly more private and inward-looking master house.



In the master dwelling, the windows at one end look into cut bedrock, with snow-capped mountains beyond. At the other end, on the rocky hillside, the view at times includes those famous New Zealand wild sheep that occasionally wander by.

If there ever was a project where the brief has actually become reality, this is it. The land has spoken, and was heard well. We are awaiting an invitation to the guest wing. And should it ever arrive, we may never leave. - Tuija Seipell.



Images by Simon Devitt

 


Architecture

September 25 2015

With a floor as beautiful as the chevron-patterned dark hardwood one in this recently renovated classic apartment, the re-imagining designers’ main job is to try to not ruin it or its harmonizing and stylish effect.
In the case of the Strasbourg, France-based private apartment in question, the other defining features are the gorgeous fourth-floor corner location with the large windows, and the elegant cast-iron railings.

Luckily, design team Tomas Umbrasas, Aidas Barzda, Tautvydas Vileikis, Rokas Kontvainis of YCL Studio knew how to leave these elements alone. Not only did they preserve them, they also emphasized them.



The gorgeous ceiling moldings, classic crystal chandeliers, the smart placing of a few ornate wall sconces, and the overall white and cool grey colouring draw attention to and highlight these time-tested features.



The five-room apartment is 114 square meters (1,227 sq.ft.) in size but it looks significantly larger because there are no tight nooks or dark corners, no hidden areas and no unnecessary doors.



The design team made one substantial – and extremely appealing - change in the original room division by creating a massive, white bath room/spa with its own windows, seating area and seemingly endless space. This alone upgrades the apartment to a totally new level.



Located in the Alsace region of North-eastern France, Strasbourg is the home of the European Parliament with more than its share of gorgeous apartments and residences.

Combining traditional and new as smartly as the YCL team has done is a perfect fit for the cool set of the town.



Based in the capital Lithuania, Vilnius, with its neoclassical and Gothic architectural highlights, the YCL team brought to the project not just a fine sense of new and modern, balance and scale, but, more important, a confident sensibility toward what must stay and what must go. - Tuija Seipell.

 

Architecture

August 18 2015

We had forgotten how beautiful grey concrete can be until we saw what Ezequiel Farca had done with a 1970s residence in Mexico City.



At the same time, we were also reminded of how much we love Farca’s elegant work in general.



To start with, the Barrancas House in Mexico City had a lot going for it before Farca came along.

It is located on a sloped property so that the four levels of the house, from basement all the way to the top, or second, floor, are all in fact on ground level.



In addition, the site overlooks a great wooded area with grown trees and greenery. The house had good bones that Farca and team members Cristina Grappin and Fernanda de la Mora preserved and then took to a new level of cool, modern comfort.



The 720 square-meter (7,750 sq ft) house is a family residence. Keeping that in mind Farca maximized the exposure to the views and daylight by opening up the rooms with floor to ceiling windows overlooking the woods. He also knocked down interior walls and replaced some with sliding screens and hidden doors and providing bay windows that open fully . All of these give the family members the option of creating specific spaces for their changing needs.



Much of the furniture was also custom-designed by Farca’s team for the Barrancas residence.

The new luxury amenities of the house now include a home theater, a wine cellar, a gym and two large terraces. Our favourite luxury features are the chic  long pool on the topmost level and the skillful use of greenery both inside the residence and outside in the new garden.



The landscape was designed with plants that adjust to the local climate, with green roof and green walls, it also has a solar energy system and a automatized water saving system.

Marble, stone and wood dominate the interior, with earthy tones and neutral colours throughout. The interior flows seamlessly together with the exterior  and all of that gives the sensation of expanded, unblocked freedom.



Ezequiel Farca and his team have achieved that tough-to-define and even tougher to accomplish harmony where the old and new coexist, where the exterior and interior belong together and where the meticulous design work does not honk its own horn but instead, stays stylishly in the background where it belongs. - Tuija Seipell.



Photography: Jaime Navarro, Roland Halbe

 

Architecture

August 4 2015

A confident black margin drawn on a crisp sheet of pristine, white paper anchors everything on that sheet and divides it decisively into sections. But it leaves everything else free and open; to be decided later, to be filled in - perhaps in writing or with drawings or other media.

That same feeling of order and balance - and also of rejuvenating freedom - permeates this Olivier Dwek-designed residence on the island of Zante. Zante, also known as Zakynthos, is one of the Ionian Islands that also include Kefalonia, Ithaca, Corfu and Paxi along the western coastline of central Greece.



The elegant dwelling sits confidently on the ocean-side ledge of the island, overlooking the neighbouring island of Kefalonia (or Cephalonia).

The British-born, Brussels-based, 45-year-old architect Dwek is a master of the pure, clean line.


 
In the Zante residence, the first level includes an entrance hall, outdoor dining room, kitchen, living room, patio, swimming pool, terraces and a bedroom. The large master bedroom is located on the second level.
All windows look over the steep hillside and face the beautiful vista of Kefalonia.



There is so much we love about this project. Obviously we are drawn to the elegant minimalist white-and-black scheme, the efficient, open floor plan, the overall openness, the refined proportions, and the complete lack of gimmicks or unnecessary enhancements.

And we always love a structure that leaves room to breathe, see, hear and experience the surroundings.



But in this particular house, our favourite feature is the black margin. We see them in the frames for the windows and sliding doors, the edges of marble counter tops, the play of light and shadow on the white surfaces.



These margins border and outline the life inside and outside, and they define the scenery and direct the viewer to the incredible surrounding beauty. - Tuija Seipell.

 

Architecture

May 29 2015

May we just move in, please? This super-sleek, one-storey residence is rather close to a perfect minimalist house.


 
It fits in its surroundings and manages to appear like a real home for real people although it also reveals its cool, sophisticated character that reflects the tastes of the owners.
 


 
Located in residential suburb, about a 15-minute drive away from Chisinau, the capital of Moldova, the 264 square-metre (2841 sq.ft.), three- bedroom house centers around an inner courtyard that also has a swimming pool.


 
The car port merges seamlessly with the overall scheme and does not appear like an add-on. As a clean concrete cell, the car port not just shelters the owner’s retro sports car, but it also creates a display case for it. The shelter works just like a perfect box for the perfect gift; it enhances it but does not compete with it or take anything away from it.


 
The minimalist general approach, and the low profile and scale, make the structure seem unpretentious and sleek and much smaller than it actually is.


 
Our eyes are drawn to the elegant use of white as the colour of floors, and even the concrete and gravel outside.


This same educated minimalism is in view also inside the residence, where minimalism is not taken to a painful degree, neither is the harmony broken by arbitrary, and so often meaningless, splashes of colour. Much of the furniture is by Poliform and B&B Italia


 
Glass, wood and concrete are the main materials used in this house, affectionately called the Piano House. This name comes from the display-like open space around the grand piano. Because the piano is on display in a minimalist setting, it becomes the main character. Or, conversely, one might say that the piano as the main character has dictated the fact that open space is needed around it. The key point here is balance, and knowing what to leave out.


 
We believe that it is very easy to be complicated, not just in architecture and design in general, but in all creative endeavours. Minimalism is not easy, as we have said on so many occasions, but when it IS executed well, it creates an elegant sense of ease and lightness.

Everything belongs, everything fits together, everything speaks the same, language. Tuija Seipell

Architecture

May 26 2015

Build a massive house made of concrete in the middle of a grove of 130 beautiful protected old oak trees and you have an ugly disaster in your hands.
 
This scenario sounds likely but it was elegantly avoided in the Oak Pass Main House that Walker Workshop designed for a private client in Beverly Hills, California.


 
The house sits on a 3.5-acre site at the rim of a canyon, which is why the fantastic views were the main consideration of the house plan.
 
The ornate oak trees provide a contrast for the hard edges of the low-lying house - a delicate balance not easily achieved.


 
The use of glass allows for views and vistas over and through the house and makes the mass of the house seem much smaller than it is.


 
Structural concrete is the main building material as it lets large spans of space to flow into each other without columns or supports.
 

All of this leads to a calm harmony between the site and the elegant minimalist house.


 
The 8,000 square-foot (743 sq.m.) single-family residence includes four bedrooms on the lower level beneath the green grassy roof, two kitchens, a dining room, a living room, an office, a 900-bottle wine room, an exercise room, a media room, four bathrooms and a powder room, a foyer and an art gallery courtyard plus a garage.


 
A 75-foot lap pool with infinity edges on three of four sides, bisects the house.


 
This large residence is on the same property with the much written-about Oak Pass Guest House that Walker Workshop completed in 2013. - Tuija Seipell.





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